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, and beyond. what should be the role of the u.s. military? we'll get an update from the region and talk with two of the senate's most influential voices on foreign policy. john mccain, and joe lieberman. and health care reform one year later. we'll ask our sunday group what is this long-term prognosis for the president's signature legislation. all, right now, on fox news sunday. >> chris: hello again from fox news in washington. before we talk with our guests, we want to bring you the latest on events in the middle east. in syria, government soldiers have been deployed around the cities that have seen the biggest protests. in yemen, talks for a peaceful transfer of power failed saturday, now authorities worry about al qaeda gaining strength in that country. and in libya, u.s. and allied planes paved the way for rebel forces to retake the key oil town of brega. for more let's bring in fox news correspondent steve harrigan in tripoli. steve? >> reporter: chris, a rapid advance by the rebels, they are moving west, quickly towards what they say is an eventual battle, right here in tripoli.
's talk about that also with retired u.s. army general george jalwan, the nato allied supreme commander. if in fact this is true that the president in recent days, maybe the past week or two, signed a covert action order, a finding, as they call it, to secretly assist the rebels who are fighting gadhafi's forces, what does that say to you? >> first of all, i have no knowledge of whether he signed a finding or not. it may be one of two things, may be an actual sort of action or it could be keep pressure on gadhafi to really feel the heat that he's feeling now with the resignation of his foreign minister and also with what i think is what is happening in london where the international community is very much united in what needs to be done. >> for all practical purposes the coalition, now nato control, they -- they have taken aside in this civil war, they want to help the rebels and see gadhafi go, even though the u.n. security council resolution didn't go that far as we all know. here's the question. if in fact the president signed a secret finding that goes way beyond what the coalition
with u.s. ambassador to the u.n., susan rice. >> brown: then, we get the latest on the radiation containment efforts in japan as the government there raises the alert level. >> suarez: plus jeffrey kaye, in beijing, has chinese reaction to the japanese nuclear crisis. >> the nation is in the process of building 37 new nuclear pourpts, and is now reexamining safety. >> brown: mars and david brooks provide their weekly analysis. >> suarez: and fred de sam lazaro gets a rare look inside syria, where the government is just beginning to be challenged by protesters. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> okay, listen. somebody has got to get serious. >> i think... >> we need renewable energy. >> ...renewable energy is vital to our planet. >> you hear about alternatives, right? wind, solar, algae. >> i think it's going to work an a big scale. only, i think it's going to be affordable. >> so, where are they? >> it has to work in the real world. at chevron, we're investing millions in solar and biofuel technology to ma
plants right here in the united states. >>> and will the u.s. supreme court green light a massive discrimination lawsuit against walmart? arguments today in one of the most important workers' rights cases the court has ever heard. i'm wolf blitzer. you're in "the situation room." >>> moammar gadhafi and his troops are being accused of new carnage and destruction. just hours after president obama tried to explain the u.s. mission in libya to the american people. this hour we have breaking news. we're learning about major, major setbacks for rebel forces in several cities. in misrata, witnesses say government forces are hammering the city hard, firing bullets over civilians' heads and telling them to run for their lives. gadhafi is fighting back with a vengeance against rebels who had regained ground in recent days under the cover of coalition air strikes. >>> and joining us now in ajdabiya is our own arwa damon. you're with the rebels there. how are they doing, arwa? what's the latest? >> reporter: well, wolf, it's been another bitterly disappointing day for the opposition here. th
>>> on the broadcast tonight, sending weapons. tonight the prospect of u.s. weapons in the hands of libya's rebel forces. the president says he won't rule it out, so our own richard engel goes inside those rebel forces for a closer look. >>> radiation fears. the nuclear crisis in japan has a lot of people asking could it happen here, and would warning systems work if it did? >>> price check. a new drug to help prevent premature babies, but at what cost for those who need it? >>> and the close call for an american president 30 years ago tonight. what we didn't know until now. >>> also here tonight, the first-ever view of a neighbor of ours. "nightly news" begins now. captions paid for by nbc-universal television >>> good evening. right about now during these past few days across our country, people are watching this unfolding situation in libya. the rebels versus gadhafi. americans have heard president obama defending the u.s. air campaign he ordered, sending our service members to fight a third concurrent conflict far from home. in our conversation with the president yesterday, h
are outgunned and may not be able to take another city. the question before president obama now, should be our u.s. arm the rebels? >> i am not ruling it out or in. >> we will have more from the president in a one-on-one interview with brian williams later in this hour. the air starks' targeted tripoli tonight. 22 tomahawk missiles. the largest air assault in recent days. the defense department says the price tag for u.s. taxpayers so far is about $550 million. that is expected to run about $40 million more over the next three weeks. hillary clinton today called this a turning point in libya when she was in london. she met with one of the rebel leaders. what are you seeing on the ground in libya? >> i still can't get over that number, $550 million to destroy tanks from the air. i don't understand how the price tag gets so high so quickly. it could look like a turning point on the ground, but for gaddafi's forces, he is crushing the rebellion. horrible reports emerging. here in the east, his troops began a counteroffensive, erasing many of the gains they had accomplished. >> at times today the rebe
of the stricken reactor is at the fukushima plant. radiation continues to spread from the site. u.s. engineers and others are explaining their options of containing the leak. >> in the small village 40 kilometers northeast of fukushima, while outside detroit exclusion zone, the people living here thought they were safe -- northeast of fukushima, well east -- outside of the exclusion zone. >> this has exceeded the data. >> the latest news from fukushima also offers no grounds for optimism. yvette tb's do not know when or even if they will be able to return home -- in evacuees -- the evacuees do not know. >> we do not know when the situation will normalize, and we do not think there will be a future for us in the city. >> operator tepco has decided to decommission four of the reactors. filling them up may be necessary. >> government and experts are considering but these four buildings at the fukushima-dai- ichi plant to stop the spread of the substances. >> a they will spray it with a synthetic resin to try to prevent radioactive dust from being blown away or being watched to see. in a refugee c
the american people tonight to explain the u.s. mission in libya. the reasoning behind it. the u.s. military's role, and are we go from here. all this comes on the heels of a significant, rather, a dramatic victory for the administration with nato agreeing yesterday to take command of the mission including the ground attack. that as international airstrikes continue for the 9th night over the nation. libya state tv broadcast these images from a southern city of sabha claiming the attacks were against civilians. top nato commander today hitting back against suggestions that nato forces are essentially providing air cover for the rebels. >> our goal, our goal, it is to help protect civilians and population centers from attack or that are the threat of an attack. >>shepard: the in six not to take sides but we have. the opposition is benefiting, before the no-fly zone they were in trouble but this has weakened the military. and now the two sides are fighting on equal terms because of us and they are closing in on muammar qaddafi's hometown, a key government stronghold on the road to tripoli. and
evening. i'm bret baier. pentagon officials say so far the u.s. spent $580 million on the libyan conflict. while we're committed to the operation financially, militarily and diplomatically, questions remain about what it will mean to deem the mission a success. james rosen is at the state department. good evening. >> reporter: good evening. president obama and top commanderrers pushed forward on the parallel and separate path to strip muammar gaddafi of his ability to wage war and pressuring him to resign. today a top nato commander said the missions may connect over time in london, secretary of state hillary clinton met with colleagues from the united nations, europe and arab league to sketch out end game in libya. clinton said arming the libyan rebels were not discussed and only vaguely did she address growing speculation that gaddafi will receive asylum. >> we believe he must go. we're working with the international community to try to achieve that outcome. and look for political resolution which could include leaving the country. >> bret: we are not engaged and look for him to go does
of power. >> as u.s. president obama outlines his position, delegates from dozens of country s arriie in london to discuss libya's future. >>> hello, 5:00 a.m. in washington, 10:00 a.m. in london. >> you're watching "world one live" from london. also ahead. >>> this is a pro-government rally, organized to show support for syria's president assad. >>> more trouble at the japan fukushima nuclear plant. a plutonium leak and tons of contaminated water are the latest hazards. >> good news out of denmark. watch this. >> yeah! >> yes! >> delight for police searching for a missing 3-year-old as news comes in that he's been found. >>> we begin with the crisis in libya and foreign ministers from more than 40 countries are meeting in london today to talk about how libya can move ahead without moammar gadhafi. u.s. secretary of state hillary clinton's going to be there, so will the british prime minister david cameron and the u.n. secretary general ban ki-moon. there will be a strong showing from the arab world with representatives from qatar, jordan, lebanon, iraq, morocco and tunisia. the talks
united does admit that united will be shrinking it's domestic u.s. network because, he says, the focus in the future is going to be on international coverage. >> the domestic u.s. is a very difficult place to make money. brutal regulation and overtaxation, so it's very hard to make money domestically and that's why our growth has been international. even this year as we were originally going to grow between 1% and 2% this year and because of high fuel prices, we have brought that back to flat. but even there, that flat is comprised of shrink the domestic systems and growing the international systems. >> this is fascinating because this tells us that the united-continental merger says that airlines in the united states is going to start to look very different. it's got these massive hubs, chicago, washington, houston, newark, los angeles, san francisco, denver. but they're going to be geared to funneling out to the rest of the world. >> so did he say anything about the frequent flyer miles? that's what i want to know. >> tell me about it. he did admit that between them, united and conti
on intelligence operations and had been careful to what president obama had said publicly that no u.s. ground troops will be sent into libya. but, u.s. officials say there are small cia teams on the ground in eastern libya trying to fair ret out who are the leaders of the opposition? what are their motivations? what do they want for libya. said to be a special. there have been cia operatives in benghazi. when that f-15 jet went down last week and the two pilots ejected. we know one of them ended up in benghazi and some u.s. undercover agents were able to get him out of the country. shep? >> shepard: without some sort of help, it's widely believed or further help i should say it's widely belief these rebels trying to overthrow the government can't win. new debate in washington whether to give those rebels weapons. how is that going? >> that's a tough question, because some military leaders have said they have seen, quote, flickers of al qaeda involvement with the rebels and clearly nobody at the white house or no lawmaker on capitol hill wants to arm a terrorist. the white house said today tha
at a major u.s. airport, the very same one where an air traffic controller fell asleep on the job. the close call this time around. >> and she said mexican pirates killed her husband while they were jet skiing on a border lake between texas and mexico. now six months later his body hasn't been found, no one has been arrested. the latest on the investigation, plus what she is vowing to do. it's all new, it's all live, it's "happening now". >>> hi everybody. we have a whole lot of ground to cough today. we're so glad you're with us. i'm jenna lee. jon: we do indeed. i'm jon scott. "happening now", nato takes charge of air operations in libya as the fighting intensifies in one strategic oil town. those are antiqaddafi rebels, giving it all they've got, trying to retake control of brega as they come under rocket fire from pro qaddafi forces, the opposition getting hit hard in other parts of the cup as well. jenna: the u.s. considering a plan to arm the rebels, even though nato's chief is opposed to the idea. right now the cia has operatives on the ground in libya. jon: meantime a sign that qadda
for the u.s. in the battle against al qaeda and several hundred loyalists, still scattered around yemen, back country and, seizure of that weapons plant is a blow in that fight. president obama is preparing to address the situation in libya tomorrow night and his decision to intervene has been criticized from both sides of the aisle, some say it came too late. others argue, we shouldn't be involved at all and the president defending his move, saying this weekend it this our national interest. what does the president need to say to get the country on board. david drucker joins us from "roll call", to say it is in our national interest, that is a stretch? >> i don't think it is a stretch but the president has to forcefully and clearly make the case, i think the problem he has had is he did not address the nation on television the moment we went into libya on that saturday and this is something the emerging market have some to expect from presidents -- >> gregg: he's doing it under pressure now. >> i don't know if that is it or, in his mind now is the time. one of the problems the presiden
: secretary of defense robert gates from over the weekend saying libya is not an imminent threat to the u.s. but the director saying the u.s. clearly has an interest there. is that good enough? chuck nash, sir, good morning to you. there was a lot said over the weekend, some view it as conflicts statements, others say no, this gives us greater clarification. take robert gates. what do you make of his comment? >> i think he was spot on. this is not in critical national interest for the united states, however, we do have interests in the region with tunisia on one side and ejit on the other side. bill: hillary clinton said something i thought was a little more -- i thought it was revealing. she said there was no perfect option and i think everybody that looks at this, yeah, that's right, hopefully that's why you took military action. hopefully we'll have a clarification continue. -- tonight. are they split or on the same side? >> i think there was u animinity before this was launched and secretary of state clinton said something else on another network. after isn't gates said no, it's not in
housing the u.s. mission to the united nations. the ronald h. brown building was commerce secretary during clinton's first term in office. >>> the shuttle "endeavour" arrives in the space shuttle tonight. it's set to lift off for the final space mission. it's time to continue to suzanne malveaux. i'll be over to talk about the obama doctrine. >>> live from studio 7, i'm suzanne malveaux. want to get you up to speed. i want to go directly to ras lanouf. what is the latest over there? >> hi, suzanne, well, for the last hour and a half, we've been hearing and seeing a fairly heavy artillery barrage. we've been hearing the explosions taking place on the other side of ras lanouf. they are trading artillery with gadhafi's military. this is a blow to the opposition that has been forced back from its positions in ben jawad, 40 miles to the west of here. they came under heavy sustained artillery, tank and rocket fire, as well as snipers inside that town firing on them. they were unable to sustain that, stand up against it. we saw them beating a hastety retreat from ben jawad coming here to r
denouncing their president hosni mubarak. egypt is a major beneficiary of u.s. foreign aid. the u.s. was in the awkward position of supporting the pro-democracy demonstrators without alienating a longtime ally. after weeks of bloody confrontations in tahrir square, longtime president mubarak stepped down. now to libya. click on it, and gives you the latest developments and everything you need to know. libya has become the focal point of this historic movement. rebels dwept into dozens of key cities until moammar gadhafi unleashed military forces on his own people and that prompted nato to get involved with strategic air strikes. this fever has now spread to syria. again, all of the information on cnn.com. bahrain, of course, on the map here and also in yemen as well. anything can happen. john? >> and truly important questions coming out of this, what's going to happen next and why is this happening? mohammed jamjoon is live in abu dab toe answer some of these questions. let's start with syria. it appears the arab awakening is there. president assad is facing a tough choice with viol
then become the largest class action employment suit in u.s. history. walmart, america's largest private employer, says, no, the class would be too big, the plaintiffs too dissimilar, the issues too many to litigate. the plaintiffs say walmart wants a big company exception to civil rights 0 law. two lower federal courts have ruled the class and case can go forward. that brings us to the supreme court where we now have three women justices, the most ever. cnn's kate bolduan has been following the case for us and joins us to recap the arguments. kate, good to see you. any sign that the women justices were at all receptive to the plaintiffs? >> reporter: that's very interesting. i would say, first off, that it did seem in the courtroom with the aggressive question you did hear from the female justices, that they were receptive to the women's claims to the sides of the plaintiffs. but, as i just said, there are three women on this court. so what it's looking like -- we always have to give it a huge caveat here because of course we never know until the justices rule -- from the commentary and
. of course, it's been french, british, u.s. fighter jets that have been launching most of the air strikes. again, today another set of air strikes, according to a french official, in or near tripoli targeting a command center, brooke. >> reza, here is a new town, we're all learning, gadhafi's birthplace. we know the rebels are moving westward toward sirte. is that the next big battle, symbolic battle as well, for rebels here? >> reporter: well, it looks like it's the first battle in about three days. the opposition forces over the past 72 hours have been making it look relatively easy, rolling toward the west. this is the first time they're seeing resistance, little bit of fighting. that's probably because sirte is the hometown, the birthplace of colonel gadhafi. he has a lot of supporters, not clear how many have remained in this location. his tribe is based out of this place. rebel fighters telling cnn they're seeing some resistance, telling us that gadhafi loyalists using sha containry, trickery. one rebel fighter telling us that it looks like civilians have been armed. opposition figh
in the u.s. >>> a killer whale that drowned its trainer, one year ago, today, he is back in the show at sea world. some are asking if it's too soon, or even safe at all. it's all new, all live. it's "happening now". jon: good morning to you! i'm jon scott. jenna: hi everybody, i'm jenna lee. nice to have you back, jon. >>> "happening now", major setbacks in the rebels in libya, proqaddafi forces forcing them to retreat from a key oil town. it's a big story, jon. jon: it's a rapid reversal coming days after the opposition made gains west and trying to take over qaddafi's home town. nato war planes flying over the zones with the heaviest fighting, witnesses reporting hearing explosions indicating a new round of air strikes. jenna: all the chaos is affecting the oil industry. that is the industry in libya. we have word today that only one refinery is still functioning. there are now fears of a fuel shortage in libya. how that fight affect the fight. and also what that means for the rest of the world so dependent on oil now. rick leventhal is traveling to benghazi now, he's going to call us in
. at the same time, u.s. and coalition partners kept up the military attacks, launching 22 cruise missile on targets in tripoli. qaddafi's forces, however, are still better armed than the opposition and today they have the rebels on the run. they were forced to retreat just as they prepared to attack qaddafi's hometown of surt. instead, though, they were pushed back more than 25 miles, and not just by the military baby civilians who remain loyal to qaddafi. mandy clark reports tonight from the ever-shifting front line. >> reporter: an attack by qaddafi forces took rebels by surprise at bin jawad. they fought hard with everything they had but were forced back. and even while fleeing came under fire. they had originally retreated to the town because of a new threat rebels here say it wasn't just government forces but also residents firing from their homes that forced them to pull back. they confiscated these weapons handed out by qaddafi forces from locals who were loyal to the regime. how many weapons did you find in total? >> reporter: another problem the anti-qaddafi forces are facing: s
, this the morning after president obama said it would happen. watch this attack from the u.s.-led operation in the mediterranean. meanwhile, on the ground, where that tomahawk cruise missile is headed, reports from the desert that qaddafi soldiers are attacking rebel fighters with a hella machine gun and rocket fire. the lead libyan brigade, led by one of qaddafi's sons, pushing rebels away from the home town of sirte and sirte is where the battle will be joined. good morning, everybody. a lot of developments from oophnight and the morning here. welcome, i'm bill hemmer here in "america's newsroom". how you doing martha? martha: very busy. goodgood morning, bill, good morning, everybody. i'm martha maccallum. these attacks come as pentagon officials tell fox news that they are closely watching a qaddafi facility that could be storing materials to make chemical weapons and although troops are standing their ground today, there are signs that qaddafi's inner circle may be starting to crack. bill: want to go live to rick leventhal, live from ras lanuf. rick, hello. >> we're running an active c
there are big changes there, according to u.s. secretary of state hillary clinton today. she's been speaking at this emergency summit, conference of world leaders, all asking each other the same thing, that being what to do about moammar gadhafi. we're going to take you live to london in just a minute. they're also talking about the possibility that gadhafi could go into exile. but that, of course, opens up all kinds of questions as to where and who might be willing to take him. >>> first i want to go to senior international correspondent nic robertson live in tripoli. nic, before we talk about your trip to misrata, we've heard about large explosions where you are in tripoli just a short time ago. where were they? what did you hear? >> reporter: well, they were a couple of miles away from us. it's not possible to say what the target was. one of the three explosions was perhaps one of the loudest we've heard so far. and they all came within a minute of each other. what makes these explosions different from all the ones we've heard until now over the past week and a half, these came in dayligh
the transition from u.s. command has been seemless, but there are still serious questions about the u.s. involvement moving forward, what to do about the rebels, of course, reports of the cia, on the ground. this as lawmakers remain divided over our role there. >> they are clearly in violation of the act that sets three and only three conditions under which the president can commit armed forces. one them is declaration war, authorization of congress, there's been none and three is a national emergency caused by an attack on united states territories, possessions or armed forces. there has been none. so this is clearly illegal. martha: there has been so much discussion over getting approval from congress for what is going on on the ground in libya, and right now we are watching some unfolding testimony in front of the house armed services committee, secretary of defense robert gates, and also we want to play for you a comment moments ago from the chairman of the joint chiefs of staff, admiral mike mullen. let's listen to what he had to say: >> we have continued to strike at qaddafi's mil
can convey a message to the american people why it is consistent with u.s. foreign policy goals? >> i do. we have to keep in mind the uprise negligent middle east - uprising in the middle east lends to developments. in the short run we can't controll the events completely. this is important in the middle east and to abanon the people of libya would have let qaddafi slaughtter his own people and put a damper on the efforts of the youngg people in the middle east and small democrats and those who want to liberalize those societies there. >> even with nato in command, are you concerned that ultimately the pressure will be on the u.s. if qaddafi fights for months? >> i am opposed to putting our own soldiers on the ground. i believe that the coalition that is in place led by nato and not the united states will find the right balance of approaches to support the people in libya and to see that there is a new regime in place and support the spirit of revolution and spirit of change and democratic societies in the middle east . so we have to watch this, and congress has a role to play in advi
? >> reporter: no. it's not what the u.s. was hoping he'd say. it's not what the syrian people were hoping he'd say, or the rest of the middle east that was looking toward the speech as really a significant benchmark to which direction syria would go. carol, this was a defiance speech. no major concessions and the message here was loud and clear. this is about survival of the regime of bashar al assad and clear, too, he wanted to stay and fight the emergency law that everyone fought. maybe he is actually going to lift it. did not happen. so that means the regime is able to use a very serious and dangerous tool where they can just detain people at their own whims and keep people in check that way. i spoke to one analyst who said if you're anyone in damascus today and you heard that speech you would probably think twice before getting out on the streets to demonstrate because the security services have a brutal history of cracking down really hard. the syrians know the reality on the ground. and it can be dire consequences. >> it sounds so much like what happened in egypt. it's eerie. how worri
's speech, i am joined by richard murphy, it was the former u.s. ambassador to syria. think ford joining the program. -- thank you for joining the program. the president said there would be impending reform, but did not give the reform the wanted to see at a few weeks later he was out of power. that is not the case the caseassad of syria. -- that is not the case with president assad of syria. am i think you are right, he is a person who has popularity. he is counting on both to carry him through. while his spokesperson a few days ago, monday i believe, said there would be a committee formed to study a series of reforms including lifting the emergency law, obviously, thus far the committee has said this is not the moment, given that the government is facing a most serious challenge that it has had since president assad became president in 2000. that is the protests and the bloodshed and government crackdowns continue, is there a tipping point or even that regime says enough is enough, we have to give some? >> i think it is possible they will come up with some reforms. he repeated that tod
a siege until they learn hostages had been killed. but that point, they stormed the building. the u.s. supreme court is hearing evidence from one of the largest 60's -- sex discrimination lawsuits in america. women are claiming women -- women who work for walmart claimed they were held back because of their gender. the lawsuit includes more than 1.5 million women. the u.s. department of education finds virginia tech $55,000 for waiting too long to notify students when the massacre was taken place -- was taking place in 2007. the amount imposed was the maximum allowed by law. in japan, 2.5 weeks after disaster, the president said the country is on max on alert over the crippled fukushima nuclear plant. they try to prevent radioactive water from leaking into the sea. the u.s. and u.k. are starting to detect very low levels of radioactive iodine in the air. our science correspondent has the story. this does contain flash photography. >> this is the front line of japan's nuclear crisis. teams of workers braving me fukushima -- the fukushima power station. some areas are too contaminated t
the no-fly zone to nato but there are could be. u.s. covert action could be heading libya's way. john bolton is here to tell you about a secret document the president has signed. things are growing more unstake. libyan's foreign minister flees for england. why is the foreign minister running for cover in england? he says he quit, but he's not going quietly. >> to the bizarre, gadhafi has hired a former nicaragua want foreign minister -- to represent him at the united nations. strange? in the midst of this chaos and uncertainy the cost of war in libya is sigh rocketing. the pentagon saying -- is skyrocketing. the pentagon saying it has already cost american taxpayers 550 million dollars. that number is growing. and growing. and growing. former u.s. ambassador to the u.n. john bolton joins us. good evening. >> good evening. >> greta: tell me about this document that the president has signed? there's been much discussion it is a secret document what is the significance? >> it is always good to know when the president signs a finding for a covert operation we learn about it quickly the ra
of america has done what we said we would do. >> ok. so last night, he was talking about my leadership. u.s. led. go back 10 days ago, we didn't hear that. listen to this montage. >> in this effort, the united states is prepared to act as part of an international coalition. american leadership is essential. but that does not mean acting alone. in this effort, the united states is acting with a broad coalition. make no mistake, today we are part of a broad coalition. our goal is focused. our cause is just. and our coalition is strong. >> well, so that's the president as he evolved into this position and i think one of the many columnists who looked to the speech and analyzed the speech and said it best, this is a good speech if he said it 11 days ago, he would have quieted 95% of the critics. i would have found a way to give the secretary of state some credit. >> no kidding. she got him into this thing. >> it's amazing how much stuff you can do if you don't mind who gets the credit. that would have been a perfect time with hillary clinton leading -- secretary of state hillary clinton leadi
. is the threat to the u.s. and the world growing? murderous attacksing libyan forces answer president obama's address with a new round of attacks on civilians, according to the rebels. >>> and camelot, it's not. the new miniseries on jfk and jackie o., many historians say it's more fiction than fact. we speak to the producer 0 of the series ahead. >>> good afternoon. we begin with the disaster in japan where the prime minister says the country is in a stalts of maximum alert, this as the fukushima crisis worsens. japan officials have said they believe there's been a partial meltdown at three of the plants' six reactors, that's half. now today radioactive water has been discovered in the maintenance tunnel at the plant. in a a spatefrtepha fr l io ocns e nd ncte peltoeer he nnoced 2 etrothor nd, stonrm plonm seepifr the damaged nuclear power plant into the soil outside the facility. plutonium is years. but so far, officials claim the levels found are not harmful to human health. meanwhile, more traces of radiation have been found in the u.s., raising new concerns. today in california one of
their leaders. listen. one u.s. ally calls the situation there, quote, deteriorating rapidlyof. remember, some officials are calling yemen the new wild west for al qaeda terrorists. we'll get to all of that in a minute. >>> first, mubarak is gon in egypt. gadhafi is under siege in libya. is bashar assad next? that's the question today rumbling across the middle east because the spark of rolution s reached the arab powerhouse syria. this is damascus today.ot antigovernment protests spread to the syrian capital and beyond. here's where it started, daraa, south of damascus. believe it or not, we are told with all the arrests about a month ago, a dozenz teen sz ho it started. they were arrested for spraying antigovernment graffiti. then on wednesday, this government forces opened fire in daraa. accounts remain sketchy, but the tape we're about to watch does give us some idea. as we sa, the exact circumstances remain unclear, as do the numberof deaths. but yesterday the government conceded it made a mistake and announced new reforms. today's sponse from the sreet suggests that may not be enough. w
simply to stay indoors. the u.s. and other countries have set a much wider evacuation zone for their people, 80 kilometers or 50 miles from daiichi. >>> now, we've all gotten a crash course in nuclear physics over the past two weeks or so, but to understand the impact of are possible containment breachi want to bring in at. scientist. bill nye, the science guy, joins us live from l.a., and bill knows all about this. bill, good to see you. would a leaking reactor core which we m be seeing here, would it be a major escalation of this disaster or just simply another complication? >> it's probably a major escalation. now, if it's not the core that's cracked, it's some plumbing, some pipes, that lead into it. because when you get this knd of radioactivity level going up so fast, it's probably plutonium. now, this sounds like science fiction, and it kind of is. u transmute uranium into plutonium by giving it a jolt. you change someneutrons into protons and it becomes fantastically radioactive. and glen cyborg himself who won abel prize for creating plutonium, told me it's toxic a
is one of the most important countries in the region and it has great implications for u.s. national security and with regard to israel, very important place. the fact that those people are rising up is much more difficult to rise up in syria and come out to the streets of syria than in egypt so this is a major shift. i remember asking secretary gates about this when we were traveling to afghanistan just two weeks ago. i said why haven't we seen protests in syria and he said because the assad rejamie -- regime would kill those people so there are a lot of raised eyebrows to see the syrian people are protesting. >>shepard: and i would say that washington was probably caught off guard and the people were blown away by this. this was leaked, the message to the president in advance was "reform begins now." a 48 year police state was about to evaporate and when it did not happen in the south of the country they started to rise up again and we are either going to see the military back down or we are going to see the military kill them. >>jonathan: far more likely in this situation we are g
understanding, as well. and how many did we drop? >> 200. >> this hour, susan rice, u.s. ambassador to the united nations, senator joe lieberman. plus, nearly 30 years to the day since white house press secretary james brady was shot during assassination attempt on president ronald reagan. gun control advocates, jim and sarah brady are here for a rare live interview. >> caught fire. shot fire. >> followup, rawhide is okay? good day, i'm andrea mitchell live in washington. president obama says that the u.s. has done its job in libya and is reallyf trade hand over control to nato but tell take longer than he has said. nbc news has learned today that the handover will not be tomorrow, more likely toward the end of the week. meanwhile, secretary of state hillary clinton is at a libya summit in london today. this morning, she met with an envoy to discuss the next steps. >> we cannot and must not attempt to impose our will on the people of libya, but we can and must stand with them as they determine their own destiny. >> today, a top nato commander said that international pressure will li
's forces driving the opposition fighters back from their earlier gains and now the u.s. and its allies still not ruling out the possibility of arming the rebels. where are we now? good morning, everybody, welcome here, i'm bill hemmer live in "america's newsroom". how you doing martha? martha: doing well, bill, good to see you, folks. there's a lot going on. i'm martha maccallum. as you can see, there's heavy fire in the town of ras lanuf, a town the rebels thought they had taken back, now they fight a wave of nato air strikes, forces loyal to qaddafi once again back on the advance and putting the rebels in a very tough situation, pinned down by huge rockets, qaddafi's mob said to be closing in once again. bill: rec leventhal, leading our coverage, he has moved to the east of ras lanuf and what that is happened in this battle, rick? >> reporter: good morning, bill and martha. we just lost power in adjabiya, this town fell to qaddafi troops, regained by the rebels and could be taken over once again by qaddafi's troops. they have been striking rebel positions west of us in the town of ra
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